Planet Sugar

Planet Sugar is a collection of personal blogs by Sugar Labs contributors. Sugar Labs is a world-wide organization of passionate people working together to solve the same problem: giving everyone an opportunity to learn to learn. Our community members write about what excites them about learning, Sugar, and the Sugar community. In the spirit of free software, we share and criticize—that is how we learn and improve and encourage participation by newcomers. Enjoy and join the conversation.

May 26, 2015

Walter Bender

Sugar Digest 2015-05-26

1. It is with great sadness that write these words: Marco Presenti Gritti, the principal Sugar developer from Red Hat from 2006 to 2008 and one of the founders of Sugar Labs, passed away this past weekend after a long illness. Marco was a brilliant engineer whose work still reverberates throughout the Sugar stack and a warm, personable colleague, father, and husband. We will miss you Marco.

Sugar Digest

2. For those of you who are interested, we hold our GSoC group meetings on Fridays, 11:00 EST (Boston), 14:00 UTC on irc.freenode.net #sugar-meeting.

Tech Talk

3. Peter Robinson, Sam Parkinson, Sean Daly, and Iain Brown Douglas have done a great job of revamping the Sugar on a Stick spin site for Fedora.

Sugar Labs

4. Please visit our planet.

by Walter Bender at May 26, 2015 01:32 PM

May 25, 2015

OLE Nepal

Relief efforts at Khokana and Bungamati

Last week, our team members had visited Khokana and Bungamati areas to observe the situation of the people, particularly of the children. After understanding the critical environment of the area, our team decided to carry on the relief effort to…

by Sofila Vaidya at May 25, 2015 05:03 AM

May 24, 2015

OLE Nepal

Sindhupalchowk: ruins and relief

On May 20, I travelled from Kathmandu to Liskankhu, Sindhupalchowk to help with a relief program. Sindhupalchowk is one of the most severely damaged districts by the earthquake. It had been less than two months that I had travelled the same area…

by Dovan Rai at May 24, 2015 11:21 AM

May 22, 2015

Somos Azucar

Resumen de actividades Laboratorios Azúcar May 22nd

Hola,
A partir de Abril de 2015 este boletín se publicará una vez por mes.

Este es el resumen de actividad para la comunidad Laboratorios Azúcar.

Éste se compone de una agregación de fuentes como nuestro gestor de tareas, Wiki, y blogs.

Puedes publicar un comentario o participar de diferentes formas.

Si tienes una noticia o una fuente que deberíamos incluir (como un blog, etc), avísanos a todos(arroba)somosazucar.org

Hubo 33 eventos esta semana.

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Published Khokana Bungmati.
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by operador del sitio at May 22, 2015 04:19 AM

May 01, 2015

Sugarizing Paris 2015

Accepted by SugarLabs inside GSOC 2015 !

Hi everyone !
I'm Michaël Ohayon, a 4th year student at Epitech Paris.
I have been accepted by SugarLabs inside the Google Summer of Code 2015 !

What am I going to do ?
I'm going to write some apps for a educational environment with is Sugarizer. It's basically an app for you mobile, tablet or a website on your PC.

To get more in detail :
Sugar is the Operating System running on the XO.
The XO from OLPC (One Laptop per Child) is a pc made to allow every child to get access to education
Sugar Apps are made to run on the XO.

Sugarizer is a project that allows to get a Sugar experience on a browser : your phone, tablet or PC.
Sugarizer needs some app rewritting in order to get the same features as Sugar.

My project is a full rewriting of some Sugar apps : Calculate, Paint, Memorize and Record using the Sugar Web Framework in order to get close to every device. Thoses apps are the basics apps that every children need to have.

This rewriting is needed to merge apps from Sugar/Fedora and Sugarizer/Web. Those apps tends to be used by every childrens using either a XO or a Web Browser. (Including PhoneGap/Cordova supported platform such as Android/iOS).

The goal of the project is to provide the same experience for childrens ignoring the devices they are on. Moving to PhoneGap/Cordova is a really great step for Sugar, it's a way to provide the Sugar experience to every child using the web standards.

The main technologies to be used will be HTML5 and Javascript. The ability to read the Python source code is required in order to provide the same features for the Sugar Web apps as on the XO.

What's next ?
I'll post updates on the project status with this blog. I'll post both technical and non-technical blog posts.

Thanks for reading :)


by Michaël Ohayon (noreply@blogger.com) at May 01, 2015 03:34 PM

Tomeu Vizoso

Lucid sleep in the free desktop

For the past year I have been working on the kernel side to bring some ChromeOS features to upstream.

One of the areas I'm currently working on is what Google calls Lucid Sleep, which is basically the ability of performing work while the machine is in a low power state such as suspend. I'm writing this blog post because there has been interest on this in different communities and the discussion is currently a bit dispersed.

Small mobile devices have been able to do that since basically always and this feature brings it to bigger devices that traditionally have been either on or off. It's similar to what Microsoft calls InstantGo (previously Connected Standby).

A few examples of tasks that the system could perform while apparently sleeping are:
  • Checking if the battery level is so low that it would be better to completely power down the machine
  • Starting a network backup if the present connectivity allows it (a known access point may have become accessible)
  • Downloading email
  • Checking for new instant messages

With regards to functionality and leaving performance considerations aside, userspace could implement this without requiring any new support in the kernel as illustrated in this scenario:
  • We assume that a video is currently playing in YouTube
  • User closes the lid
  • PM daemon notifies userspace of an impending sleep
  • Browser pauses playback
  • Compositor switches off the screen
  • Kernel freezes userspace, suspends devices and puts the CPUs to idle
  • Time passes...
  • RTC alarm fires off
  • Kernel resumes devices and unfreezes userspace
  • Userspace realizes there hasn't been any user activity since it went to sleep last, so stays in "dark resume" mode
  • Userspace does any lucid tasks it wants, then goes back to sleep again
  • Kernel freezes userspace, suspends devices and puts the CPUs to idle
  • Time passes...
  • User opens lid
  • Kernel resumes devices and unfreezes userspace
  • PM daemon notices the SW_LID event, so notifies userspace that this is a full-on resume
  • Compositor switches screen on
  • Browser resumes playback

No changes needed in the kernel is always good news, but there's two issues.

Lost input events


Sometimes the event from the input device that woke the system up gets lost before it reaches userspace, so we don't know if we can stay dark and do our lucid stuff, or if the user expects the machine to power completely on.

This is in any case a bug, but if it needs to be fixed in the firmware, we may not be able to do much about it. At most we could get the kernel to synthesize an input event, but sometimes it may not have enough information to do so.


Performance


When the system wakes up, there tends to be a lot to do in the kernel and userspace, so it could take several seconds for the screen to come up from the moment the user opened the lid in the scenario presented above.

For ChromeOS this isn't acceptable so they are carrying some patches in their kernel that make some shortcuts possible (the screen is left on at suspend time, and the kernel knows at resume time whether it has to power it on based on which was the wakeup source, thus not having to wait for userspace).

Fortunately, there have been some changes recently in the kernel PM subsystem that can speed up resumes quite a bit and we can make use of them to offset the penalty of dropping those shortcuts.

The first is idling the CPUs instead of suspending to firmware, which on modern SoCs should be quite efficient and much faster, by a few tenths of seconds.

The other is to leave idle devices that are already in a low power state alone when suspending, which means that we don't have to wait for them to resume when the system wakes up. In every system I have seen there's always a few devices that take a long time to resume, so this can shave several tenths of seconds from the total resume time.

Both need some amount of support in either the platform or in device drivers, and that's what I'm currently working on for the Tegra-based Chromebooks.

by Tomeu Vizoso (noreply@blogger.com) at May 01, 2015 01:27 PM

April 28, 2015

Mel Chua

On the diversity-readiness of STEM environments: “It’s almost as if I could only enter the makerspace as a janitor.”

My thoughts from an online discussion with other female Olin engineers on this NYT article on “how to attract female enginers,”, edited for context. In particular, we brought up the (well-worn) claim that women don’t want to “just focus on the tech stuff” and want to “do sociotechnical/humanitarian work that makes a difference in the world.”

I’ve built my career as a “technical community person” who “thinks beyond the technology,” and as a teacher and researcher of learning environments — so this may come as a surprise to people who know and have worked with me. But if my teenage self had had her way, I would have VASTLY preferred to “just focus on the tech stuff.”

As a kid, I wanted to choose the privilege of being oblivious and keeping my head down and immersing myself into the beauty — the sheer beauty! — and joy of STEM for STEM’s sake. I didn’t become an ECE to work on educational computers or hearing aids or anything like that. As my friend (and former roommate) Kristen Dorsey said, “I just geek out about nerdy stuff, OK?”

But I couldn’t “just geek out about nerdy stuff.” The environments where I was trying to “learn about nerdy stuff” were sociotechnically broken in a way that made it hard for me (as a disabled minority woman, among other things) to join in. If I wanted to even start being part of the technical community, I had to start by fixing the technical community — patching the roof and fixing the plumbing, so to speak — before I could even walk inside and start to live there. And when I patched the leaking roof, I patched the roof for everyone, and other people who needed non-leaky roofs to be in the community could now… be in the community as well!

For instance, I got really, really good at facilitating meetings because it was the only way I had to make meetings accessible to me — when other people facilitated meetings, they’d often forget I need to lipread, so… I just quietly started leading them myself, and ended up making meetings work better for everyone. And I found that when I drifted towards “humanitarian” projects, the people there were much more conscious of sociotechnical things and more likely to have already-healthy environments, so I would have less leaky roofs to patch, and less resistance when I tried to patch the roofs — and people actually recognized and valued roof-patching labor instead of looking down on me for not writing code full-time.

After a while of patching roofs and unclogging toilets and plastering the rotten drywall, I got a reputation in industry for being really, really good at open-source software/hardware (technical) community facilitation. It’s almost as if I could only enter the makerspace as a janitor. And part of me resented that, but never said so. But, I told myself, at least I was in the building. And I saw that my “janitorial” work made it possible for other people to enter the building and do the things they wanted to do — which were often the things I wanted to do, too! — and so I thought: okay. That’s okay. At least somebody gets to do it. I can see my gift to the community doing so much good, that I will give up my desire to learn and do the technical things — so I let my own STEM learning slide. I am good at “community work,” and I did come to genuinely love it, over time.

But if I had the choice, I would have never gone into “community work.” I would have chosen — if I had the choice — to focus on “shiny tech stuff” that… didn’t save the world at all. If my teenage self had had her way, I would not do community-facilitation-anything, I would not be thoughtful about women or minorities or disabilities or any underprivileged group in engineering… I would be oblivious to all my privilege. I’d be a kernel hacker, or an embedded geek, or something “hardcore technical,” Because I could be.

But I didn’t have the wherewithal (or the desire) to shovel all the stuff out of the way that I would have to do in order to do that. If you think of “caring/environmental labor” as a sort of tax some people have to pay in order to get to “learning/doing technical things,” my tax rate has always just been too frickin’ high.

So I have been “the full-time community person who is ridiculously good at tech stuff that she no longer gets to do,” instead of “the technical person who understands and listens to and cares about inclusion and community.” Because I cannot not patch a leaky roof. But I have always wondered what I might have grown up into, if I had learned STEM in an environment that was ready for me — without me having to fix it first.

by Mel at April 28, 2015 08:07 PM

Walter Bender

Sugar Digest 2015-04-28

Sugar Digest

1. Sugar Labs got six slots from Google. We had 67 applications — many quite strong — so there are undoubtedly a lot of disappointed students (and mentors — we have seventeen community members who have signed up). But we have six great students/projects so there is lots to look forward to this summer. Congratulations to:

  • Abhinav Anurag, Redesigning Collaboration Using Web Technologies
  • Amit Kumar Jha, Turtle Blocks for in-line programming
  • Ishan Sharma, Turtle Blocks 3D JavaScript
  • Yash Khandelwal, Music Blocks
  • Michaël Ohayon, Sugar WebBasic Activity Set
  • Richa Sehgal, Interactive Javascript Shell

We’ll be holding our first organizational meeting on Friday, May 1 at 14:00 UTC on irc.freenode.net #sugar-meeting. Please join us if you are interested in participating in any of these projects.

In the news

2. I clicked on the link, having been baited by the teaser: 16 Startups Poised to Disrupt the Education Market (You won’t believe #8). Alas, none of them have anything to do with learning.

3. Sebastian Silva posted a link to an article in ”The Atlantic” about the future role of the teacher in elementary and secondary education that is thought-provoking. In essence, the author is conceding teaching to the myriad of resources becoming available on the web and parroting Sugata Mitra’s position that children will learn given access to kiosks connected to the Internet. I remain skeptical: none of the scant evidence I have seen from Mitra (or the much talked about OLPC tablet experiment in Ethiopia) is convincing. Perhaps the succinct way I can express my doubts is to assert that no one has ever learned to program from reading a book (or attending a MOOC). You can only learn to program by programming.

I don’t doubt that resources will continue to amass on the web and that we can algorithmically steer students through those materials wherever Internet is generally available, but I am yet to be convinced that access can or should be equated to learning. Learning is a culture, one that is includes a spirit of open access, but also mutual support, respect, and responsibility. (These attributes of learning culture are tightly aligned with the culture of Free/Libre Software, one of the reasons I remain convinced that Free/Libre Software is fundamental to the future of education.) Children need access to powerful ideas, but there is still no getting around the need to do, to make, and to engage in order to learn.

In the community

4. With help from the Musson Foundation (and Trip Advisor) I ran a Turtle Art Day in Kingston, Jamaica, on 23 April for sixth-grade girls from five local schools. The girls had been given Android tablets with fairly stale bits. We tried running Turtle Blocks (both with the APK and through the browser) with out much success. So we switched to a variety of computers — whatever was kicking around the workshop venue — and the fun began in earnest. See [1] and [2] to read some of the local press about the event. (Note that the press someone turned “Turtle Art Day” into “Total Art Day”. Cute.)

5. Claudia Urrea and I will be heading to Managua in early May to both plan a Turtle Art Day and to discuss mechanisms for engaging the local universities in supporting the ongoing efforts in Nicaragua.

6. I’ll be doing a Turtle Art workshop in Tel Aviv in early June.

Tech Talk

7. The Sugar spin of Fedora 22 is now in Beta.

Sugar Labs

8. Please visit our planet.

by Walter Bender at April 28, 2015 08:06 PM

April 24, 2015

Somos Azucar

Resumen de actividades Laboratorios Azúcar April 24th

Hola,
A partir de Abril de 2015 este boletín se publicará una vez por mes.

Este es el resumen de actividad para la comunidad Laboratorios Azúcar.

Éste se compone de una agregación de fuentes como nuestro gestor de tareas, Wiki, y blogs.

Puedes publicar un comentario o participar de diferentes formas.

Si tienes una noticia o una fuente que deberíamos incluir (como un blog, etc), avísanos a todos(arroba)somosazucar.org

Hubo 2 eventos esta semana.

blog (feed #5)
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by operador del sitio at April 24, 2015 04:12 AM

April 14, 2015

Daniel Drake

Endless – a computer for emerging markets

My current project is Endless:

Read more on our website, and if you’d like to support us, head over to Endless Computers on Kickstarter.

by Daniel Drake at April 14, 2015 10:48 PM

March 30, 2015

OLPC San Francisco blogs

RACHEL

At the May 15th, 2014 meeting of olpcSF.org (I believe this was the meeting hosted by Bruce Baikie at Inveneo, 972 Mission St., San Franciso,) Bruce introduced us to the Rachel Pi project: a content server developed by WorldPossible.org.  It provides a Server/Service combination using the Rasberry Pi along with system software and content compiled by the WorldPossible team. (The "Three-Minute World Possible Intro", accessible from their home page, is well worth viewing.)

A system was soon up and running but unfortunately the video material comes in a format (mp4) that can not be rendered by the XO OLPC laptop. The most straight forward solution seemed to be to convert the mp4 files to ogv and make the corresponding edits in the html files.  Scripts were developed to do this and we had a version usable by the XOs within a short time.

At the February 2015 meeting, a consensus was reached that webm would be a better choice and so now the scripts were re-written to support conversion of mp4 files to either format (ogv or webm.) These Python scripts are available on github:

$ git clone git@github.com:alexKleider/Convert.git

In the mean time the Banana Pi has become available and WorldPossible has released a version of Rachel for it.  The Banana Pi is based on a dual core ARM processor and should therefore support more clients than the single core ARM of the Raspberry Pi B model.  A version 2 of the Raspberry Pi with a quad core ARM processor has also appeared on the market.  Both of these platforms are under study and it is hoped that we can have a version of Rachel running on all three.

There is a project planned for Tanzania, spear headed by Camille Harris with help from Hilary Naylor, and that's where our modified Rachel running on one (or more) of the Pi platforms will go; The primary school is in Nyamagongo.

by akleider at March 30, 2015 02:55 AM

March 28, 2015

Luke Faraone

Key transition

I'm migrating PGP keys from 0xF9FDD506 to 0x0C14A470. If you signed my old key, I would appreciate you signing my new key as well. Feel free to ping me with questions.

Accordingly, I've published a transition statement signed by both keys.

by Luke Faraone (noreply@blogger.com) at March 28, 2015 07:55 PM

March 21, 2015

Sugar Cordova

IMPORTANT INFO FOR GSOC APPPLICANTS APPLYING FOR SUGAR CORDOVA PROJECT

Hi,

I would request all the GSOC 2015 applicants to kindly go through http://plugins.cordova.io/#/ page and find out the plugins relevant to sugar. Also provide a brief description of how you'll go about making your suggested plugins.

Think of something apart from those implemented already !

Go though the repos you get on this link : https://github.com/apache?query=cordova-plugin and think of a similar structure for sugar ! For any kind of help, dont hesitate to ping me.

by Puneet Kaur (noreply@blogger.com) at March 21, 2015 03:21 AM

March 15, 2015

OLPC San Francisco blogs

Harmonic Effect

One of my old-time hobbies has been the open reel tape recorder. I'm a big fan!

Magnetic tape adds a certain "warmth" to the music. It seems this effect comes from the harmonic effect generated as the tape slides past the tape head. People like this effect so much, that modern-day digital music editors come with "tape effect plugins" for popular tape and decks.

So, I ran an experiment. I took the OLPC XO laptop and used Pippy Activity to generate a sine wave (6 beeps) and recorded it on tape. I should see one peak at 1000Hz.

Then, I played it back from tape, and looked at the signal on Measure Activity. We see a major peak at 1000Hz, but smaller peaks at 3000Hz and 5000Hz.

 

Very exciting! Definitely some harmonic effect going on here. Will have to investigate more to see what else happens on tape, and how it differs across brands and machines.

by sverma at March 15, 2015 06:03 AM

March 13, 2015

Fargo XO / Sugar Labs NDSU

Book chapter on building smarter computing cultures.

Chris, Matt, and Kevin have a chapter in Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities.  The chapter is a white paper that comes out of our three-year work on Sugar Labs @ NDSU; it isn’t an academic study but instead some thoughts on how a community could tie initiatives together in order to build their smarter (as well as more equitable and just) computing cultures.


by kab13 at March 13, 2015 02:16 PM

March 10, 2015

Sugar Cordova

To the students applying for GSOC - Part 2

To the students applying this year to the sugar cordova project - I would like to let you all know a few pre-requisites for the project. We expect that students should complete the following before they apply and also include their work in their application, the better you accomplish, more your chances of getting in ! So pull up you sleeves for some real work ;) Here are a list of tasks that you must all look into :

1. Go through all the post on this blog
2. Go through my sugar cordova related repos on github : https://github.com/puneetgkaur, setup the cordova for sugar with the help of my repos : https://github.com/puneetgkaur/cordova-cli, https://github.com/puneetgkaur/cordova-lib, and https://github.com/puneetgkaur/cordova-plugman. Clone these repos, follow the README on each repo and install cordova for sugar on your system.You should be able to make a simple web app for sugar with the help of this installation by using simple commands : cordova create, cordova platform add sugar, cordova build - you'll get an xo which you must try installing on sugar development environment using sugar-install-bundle command.
3. Setup your sugar development environment : http://developer.sugarlabs.org/dev-environment.md.html and explore around try making changes in code , see where the code rests and try making a few changes to the code, play around with the GUI and get a feel of the sugar environment if you arent familiar before.
4. Know all about cordova - from in and out , visit the cordova repos : https://github.com/apache/cordova-lib, https://github.com/apache/cordova-cli, https://github.com/apache/cordova-plugman , https://github.com/apache/cordova-js and some pltforms repo too : https://github.com/apache/cordova-android, https://github.com/apache/cordova-ios etc. Read the docs : http://cordova.apache.org/docs/en/4.0.0/
5. Know about sugar -web architecture : http://developer.sugarlabs.org/web-architecture.md.html , https://github.com/sugarlabs/sugar-web , https://surajgillespie123.wordpress.com/
6. Carefully read through the last post of how the cordova plugins are made and make a demo plugin for sugar  - note - we want a working prototype of the demo for you to be eligible for the gsoc project - it can be a very simple prototype - just to judge whether you got the workflow or not - if you need help you can mail me.
7. Suggest a list of plugins you aim to code this summer along with the relevantworkflow as to how you think you'll approach each of them - Note : Its shouldn't be the one in air ! We want a concrete set of list which you think you would accomplish, a result of thorough visualization and observation of yourself of how much time you would take to complete each plugin and what all you can do, a complete list of plugins which you think are feasible and good for the sugar community - If you wish to discuss your ideas feel free to discuss them on mail - note : better the list and more feasible it looks on your profile - higher your chances of getting selected.
8.Lastly, keep a blog about your progress on these points, a record of all what you have done and whats remaining, a place where you jot down your daily progress on the above points and present to us in a systematic manner and dont forget - we are always there to help you when you need help - email at puneet.gkaur@gmail.com for help if needed.


All the best guys !!

by Puneet Kaur (noreply@blogger.com) at March 10, 2015 05:11 PM

February 26, 2015

OLPC fun in Bhagmalpur, India

Bossa Nova in Banaras

In my previous post, I had written about unencumbered codecs that ship on the OLPC XO, versus the popular demand for video in MP4 container (usually H.264 video). This post has a strange twist with another container: WebM.

WebM is a container put forth by Google. They also proceeded to embed the codec support within Chromium/Chrome. Firefox supports it natively as well. So, videos in WebM will play in Chromium/Chrome and Firefox without a plug-in.

When I travel, I download my favorite tunes from YouTube by using the “FlashGot” plugin. I prefer to download these in WebM (the irony!). Perhaps I am violating some “Terms of Service” somewhere, but that’s a rant for another day.

After my Bhagmalpur visit in Jan 2015, I headed back to Hyderabad. I took a train from Shahganj to Varanasi (aka Banaras) and then after a short stop, I was scheduled to take a flight out of the Varanasi airport in Babatpur (rural Banaras). As fate would have it, or rather as Indigo airlines would have it, their pilot wasn’t experienced enough to land the aircraft in the fog, and so, we had no return aircraft. I was stranded at Varanasi airport with no way to take another flight. Long story short, I ended up spending the night at the airport (usually a No No, but we had special permission!) along with two other travelers. They turned out to be visitors from Brazil and Italy. We had a great conversation that evening and the next day, hanging out at a small airport, eating stale cheese sandwiches. I got reminded of the Langoliers!

Waiting for the Langoliers at Varanasi airport!

Waiting for the Langoliers at Varanasi airport!

Towards the afternoon, I recalled that I had a copy of some “Bossa Nova” tunes downloaded in WebM format. What luck! Here were two people who spoke [Brazilian] Portuguese, stranded in the thick of rural India, and I had “Desafinado” and “Girl from Ipanema” on my laptop! We sat down and listened to a somewhat strange rendition of “Desafinado” by

1) Nova Music LA and

2)  an interesting version of Girl (actually Boy) from Ipanema by Dionne Warwick and Sacha Distel

(with appropriate apologies to Vinícius de Moraes, Antônio Carlos Jobim and João Gilberto).

Such great coincidence, or perhaps I’m just cool like that :-) Shortly after that, we thankfully got onto our respective flights and headed our different ways. After keeping in touch with my new friends, it turns out they are biodiversity researchers. I hope they’ll come visit us in California to see the Redwoods for themselves! I hope the Langoliers will enjoy the Bossa Nova when they get to the Varanasi airport ;-)

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="312" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FolEno814Gk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" type="text/html" width="500"></iframe>

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="312" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iRIxByKzIJE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" type="text/html" width="500"></iframe>

 

Desafinado on the OLPC XO-4 in HTML5

Desafinado on the OLPC XO-4 playing natively on YouTube in HTML5


by sv3rma at February 26, 2015 02:39 AM

January 31, 2015

OLPC fun in Bhagmalpur, India

To Ogg or not to Ogg, that is the question

In this recent trip to Bhagmalpur, Anish Mangal and I discovered something interesting. We’ve strived hard to keep the content available through unencumbered formats such as Ogg Vorbis for audio and Ogg Theora for video. Unsurprisingly, the OLPC XO laptop supports these out of the box, but will not run MPEG 4 videos.

Some kids were upset. How would they watch Shah Rukh Khan on their XOs? These kids go to a repair shop nearby and get videos copied over to a USB stick for a small sum of money. However, the videos are in MP4, and they don’t play on the XO.

Yet, we found a Shah Rukh Khan song number on a XO. How did that happen? Did they install the MP4 codec on the laptop? Some conversations later, we found out. They first figured out that the TED videos that do play on the XO are in OGV format. Next, they asked the guy at the shop to convert the Shah Rukh Khan MP4 to OGV. That’s it. Simple as a samosa. Now Shah Rukh Khan lives in OGV! Richard M. Stallman and Shah Rukh Khan are happy together in some universe :-)

SRK in OGV

SRK in OGV


by sv3rma at January 31, 2015 04:49 AM

January 03, 2015

Sugar Labs Argentina

2014 at work

Time to do a balance, at least related to the work I did in the year.
As I found difficult remember all I did in the year, and we moved to GitHub,did a few scripts and used the statistics provided by the site.


First, a disclaimer. Measure work in commits as any other way of measure,have a very relative value. Different work have difficult than can't be compared. In my case, work in activities usually is much easier and fast than work in the toolkit or Sugar. At times reviews and testing the work of other takes a lot of time, and so. But these are the numbers I have, then, let's play with that.

This is a distribution of the commits in the different repositories I maintain:
 

Of course, many hackers contributed to these projects. From the logs I can find to: Aneesh Dogra, Cristian García,Daksh Shah,gauravp94, Goutam, Guillermo Trinidad,Ignacio Rodríguez, James Cameron, Martin Abente Lahaye, Sai Vineet, Sam Parkinson and Sebastian Silva. Paul Cotton provided improved designs for many activities.

My Open Source Report Card say I am one of the 8% most active Python users... I suppose that is pretty good, but more than nothing, could be because I have the fortune of do all my work in the open.

This year, I released a version of art4apps module, and new versions of Develop, Domino, Finance, FotoToon, Help, ImageViewer, Log, Maze, Memorize, Poll and Read. Many improvements in these activities were developed by students participating in Google Summer of Code and Google Code In contests.

I was lucky to of participate in the Young Hackers Summit in Montevideo, and travel to San Francisco to represent SugarLabs in the Google CodeIn Summit with the contest winners Ignacio Rodríguez and  Jorge Gomez.

Finally, I am happy to note we organized with the help of Manuel Quiñones and Martin Abente the first SugarLabs Backgrounds Contest and that backgrounds will be available in the next version of Sugar.

by Gonzalo Odiard (noreply@blogger.com) at January 03, 2015 06:52 AM

December 10, 2014

Fargo XO / Sugar Labs NDSU

The Troubling Optics Behind the President Learning to Code : Stager-to-Go

The Troubling Optics Behind the President Learning to Code : Stager-to-Go.

I was just telling a friend that I hate getting sucked in by Code.org and Code Hour and all the program or be programmed rhetoric.  Yet I keep getting sucked in.

After reading this, I will be stronger.


by kab13 at December 10, 2014 10:00 PM