Planet Sugar

Planet Sugar is a collection of personal blogs by Sugar Labs contributors. Sugar Labs is a world-wide organization of passionate people working together to solve the same problem: giving everyone an opportunity to learn to learn. Our community members write about what excites them about learning, Sugar, and the Sugar community. In the spirit of free software, we share and criticize—that is how we learn and improve and encourage participation by newcomers. Enjoy and join the conversation.

April 15, 2015

Somos Azucar

Resumen de actividades Laboratorios Azúcar April 15th

Hola,
Este es el resumen de actividad para la comunidad Laboratorios Azúcar.

Éste se compone de una agregación de fuentes como nuestro gestor de tareas, Wiki, y blogs.

Puedes publicar un comentario o participar de diferentes formas.

Si tienes una noticia o una fuente que deberíamos incluir (como un blog, etc), avísanos a todos(arroba)somosazucar.org

Hubo 8 eventos esta semana.

generic (feed #9)
blog (feed #5)
generic (feed #8)
generic (feed #9)
blog (feed #5)
generic (feed #3)
generic (feed #9)
blog (feed #5)

by operador del sitio at April 15, 2015 07:52 AM

April 14, 2015

Daniel Drake

Endless – a computer for emerging markets

My current project is Endless:

Read more on our website, and if you’d like to support us, head over to Endless Computers on Kickstarter.

by Daniel Drake at April 14, 2015 10:48 PM

April 13, 2015

Somos Azucar

Faircoin accepted / Aceptamos Faircoin

(español al pie)

In order to ease the process of making donations to help our team’s activities and projects, we have activated an account for donations in Faircoin.

Faircoin is a digital cryptographic currency based on the Bitcoin technology, backed up by the Faircoop cooperative. Faircoin is a model of technology designed to improve people’s lives and guarantee their freedom.

It is possible to acquire Faircoins in different ways, even with a credit card, therefore we have disabled traditional means of donations.

If you wish to make recurrent donations or have a second alternative, please look at our donations page.

Our faircoin address is: fQBee2AbJQTkHsYPPu9ve5DAsDzjym7B5Y

Para facilitar el proceso de realizar donaciones para ayudar en las actividades y proyectos del equipo, hemos activado una cuenta para donaciones mediante Faircoin.

Faircoin es una moneda digital criptográfica basada en la tecnología de Bitcoin, que se encuentra respaldada por la cooperativa Faircoop. Faircoin es un modelo de tecnología diseñado para mejorar la vida y garantizar la libertad de las personas.

Es posible adquirir Faircoins de diferentes maneras incluso con una tarjeta de crédito, de modo que hemos desactivado las donaciones tradicionales.

Si deseas hacer donaciones recurrentes o una segunda alternativa, porfavor consulte nuestra página de donaciones.

Desde siempre muchas gracias por sus generosas contribuciones.

Nuestra dirección de faircoin es: fQBee2AbJQTkHsYPPu9ve5DAsDzjym7B5Y

by operador del sitio at April 13, 2015 09:51 PM

April 09, 2015

Walter Bender

Sugar Digest 2015-04-09

Sugar Digest

1. I just returned from India, where I had the pleasure of giving the keynote at BITs Pilani (my theme was how Sugar can provide the means for appropriate of knowledge) and then headed to Mumbai to give some Turtle Art workshops. At Pilani, which draws upon students from across all of India, I had a chance to spend time with students to discuss Sugar in greater detail and met with several GSoC candidates. In Mumbai, I was able to use the Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education as a base (thanks to G Nagarjuna). Turtle Art Day was split across two venues: first, a workshop for educators, where we put the new Javascript version through a workout, and then at a nearby school, where we worked with a fourth grade classroom using some XO-1 laptops. Both groups seemed to take to turtle — “hard fun” had by all. While in Mumbai, I also had a chance to visit with Tata Trusts, to discuss possible venues for collaboration, including a possible Sugar pilot in Assam. And I visited IIT Bombay, where I met with the IITB Tata Centre, which pursues education and development projects across the subcontinent. Many thanks to Harriet Vidyasagar, who both helped to organize the Mumbai visits and to provide insights into local culture and needs.

2. At Monday’s Sugar Labs oversight board (SLOB) meeting, we voted to add two new members to the Sugar Labs Membership committee: Sebastian Silva and Caryl Bigenho. They have tasked themselves with getting the members list refreshed. We are looking to recruit another committee member (or two) to help with outreach. Someone connected to the community of youths contributing patches to Sugar would be ideal. Also, recruiting more educators who use Sugar in their classrooms would help round out the committee.

3. 67 students have applied to work as interns for Sugar Labs as part of Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2015. I’ve read through the applications and we have some very strong candidates. It will be a difficult decision as to how assign the slots we receive from Google — the number is still to be determined. I have already begun looking for other means of support we might offer to some of the qualified students who don’t make the cut. The mentors are meeting this evening to discuss the applications.

In the community

4. I’ll be doing a Turtle Art Day in Kingston, Jamaica, on 23 April. Details to follow. I’d love to reconnect with any Sugar users while I am in the area.

Tech Talk

5. James Cameron has been running performance tests on the XO-1 hardware, comparing boot and activity launch times across a number of builds. It is great to have some data to look at. The good news is that we have been making steady progress over the past few releases in terms of reducing boot and launch times. Those of you running old versions of Sugar/Fedora on XO-1 hardware should consider looking at Sugar 104. Many bug fixes, improved stability, etc., and as James has demonstrated, seemingly minimal impact on performance.

6. Peter Robinson announced the availability of Release Candidate 1 of Sugar 104 on Fedora 22. Please help with testing. (The .iso files can be found at https://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/alt/stage/22_Beta_RC1. Look for SoaS images for your preferred architecture.)

7. We will be meeting on Saturday, 11 April, to continue discussing plans the 106 release. Please join Martin Abente Lahaye and the Developer team on irc.freenode.net (#sugar-meeting) at 22:00 UTC.

Sugar Labs

8. Please visit our planet.

by Walter Bender at April 09, 2015 02:46 PM

March 30, 2015

OLPC San Francisco blogs

RACHEL

At the May 15th, 2014 meeting of olpcSF.org (I believe this was the meeting hosted by Bruce Baikie at Inveneo, 972 Mission St., San Franciso,) Bruce introduced us to the Rachel Pi project: a content server developed by WorldPossible.org.  It provides a Server/Service combination using the Rasberry Pi along with system software and content compiled by the WorldPossible team. (The "Three-Minute World Possible Intro", accessible from their home page, is well worth viewing.)

A system was soon up and running but unfortunately the video material comes in a format (mp4) that can not be rendered by the XO OLPC laptop. The most straight forward solution seemed to be to convert the mp4 files to ogv and make the corresponding edits in the html files.  Scripts were developed to do this and we had a version usable by the XOs within a short time.

At the February 2015 meeting, a consensus was reached that webm would be a better choice and so now the scripts were re-written to support conversion of mp4 files to either format (ogv or webm.) These Python scripts are available on github:

$ git clone git@github.com:alexKleider/Convert.git

In the mean time the Banana Pi has become available and WorldPossible has released a version of Rachel for it.  The Banana Pi is based on a dual core ARM processor and should therefore support more clients than the single core ARM of the Raspberry Pi B model.  A version 2 of the Raspberry Pi with a quad core ARM processor has also appeared on the market.  Both of these platforms are under study and it is hoped that we can have a version of Rachel running on all three.

There is a project planned for Tanzania, spear headed by Camille Harris with help from Hilary Naylor, and that's where our modified Rachel running on one (or more) of the Pi platforms will go; The primary school is in Nyamagongo.

by akleider at March 30, 2015 02:55 AM

March 28, 2015

Luke Faraone

Key transition

I'm migrating PGP keys from 0xF9FDD506 to 0x0C14A470. If you signed my old key, I would appreciate you signing my new key as well. Feel free to ping me with questions.

Accordingly, I've published a transition statement signed by both keys.

by Luke Faraone (noreply@blogger.com) at March 28, 2015 07:55 PM

March 26, 2015

OLE Nepal

Our duties teaches us more than what we expect!

The afternoon of January 18, saw me and Peter seated in a Buddha Air Flight to Dhangadhi. Our final destination was Chainpur, Bajhang. We had to deploy XO laptops and E-Pustakalaya server in 4 schools and subsequently, provide support to the schools. Since we were there primarily for support, I would be talking solely about [...]

by Sawal Acharya at March 26, 2015 10:54 AM

March 21, 2015

Sugar Cordova

IMPORTANT INFO FOR GSOC APPPLICANTS APPLYING FOR SUGAR CORDOVA PROJECT

Hi,

I would request all the GSOC 2015 applicants to kindly go through http://plugins.cordova.io/#/ page and find out the plugins relevant to sugar. Also provide a brief description of how you'll go about making your suggested plugins.

Think of something apart from those implemented already !

Go though the repos you get on this link : https://github.com/apache?query=cordova-plugin and think of a similar structure for sugar ! For any kind of help, dont hesitate to ping me.

by Puneet Kaur (noreply@blogger.com) at March 21, 2015 03:21 AM

March 17, 2015

OLE Nepal

Solukhumbu Visit: photo series

When the Phaplu airport finally opened after a year-long closure for repair, our team immediately planned a visit to five of our program schools in Solukhumbu last November. We were glad to find the schools and the teachers remain ever enthusiastic about using laptops in classrooms. Our team provided essential technical support at Dudhkunda Lower [...]

by Dovan Rai at March 17, 2015 04:39 AM

March 15, 2015

OLPC San Francisco blogs

Harmonic Effect

One of my old-time hobbies has been the open reel tape recorder. I'm a big fan!

Magnetic tape adds a certain "warmth" to the music. It seems this effect comes from the harmonic effect generated as the tape slides past the tape head. People like this effect so much, that modern-day digital music editors come with "tape effect plugins" for popular tape and decks.

So, I ran an experiment. I took the OLPC XO laptop and used Pippy Activity to generate a sine wave (6 beeps) and recorded it on tape. I should see one peak at 1000Hz.

Then, I played it back from tape, and looked at the signal on Measure Activity. We see a major peak at 1000Hz, but smaller peaks at 3000Hz and 5000Hz.

 

Very exciting! Definitely some harmonic effect going on here. Will have to investigate more to see what else happens on tape, and how it differs across brands and machines.

by sverma at March 15, 2015 06:03 AM

March 13, 2015

Fargo XO / Sugar Labs NDSU

Book chapter on building smarter computing cultures.

Chris, Matt, and Kevin have a chapter in Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities.  The chapter is a white paper that comes out of our three-year work on Sugar Labs @ NDSU; it isn’t an academic study but instead some thoughts on how a community could tie initiatives together in order to build their smarter (as well as more equitable and just) computing cultures.


by kab13 at March 13, 2015 02:16 PM

March 10, 2015

Sugar Cordova

To the students applying for GSOC - Part 2

To the students applying this year to the sugar cordova project - I would like to let you all know a few pre-requisites for the project. We expect that students should complete the following before they apply and also include their work in their application, the better you accomplish, more your chances of getting in ! So pull up you sleeves for some real work ;) Here are a list of tasks that you must all look into :

1. Go through all the post on this blog
2. Go through my sugar cordova related repos on github : https://github.com/puneetgkaur, setup the cordova for sugar with the help of my repos : https://github.com/puneetgkaur/cordova-cli, https://github.com/puneetgkaur/cordova-lib, and https://github.com/puneetgkaur/cordova-plugman. Clone these repos, follow the README on each repo and install cordova for sugar on your system.You should be able to make a simple web app for sugar with the help of this installation by using simple commands : cordova create, cordova platform add sugar, cordova build - you'll get an xo which you must try installing on sugar development environment using sugar-install-bundle command.
3. Setup your sugar development environment : http://developer.sugarlabs.org/dev-environment.md.html and explore around try making changes in code , see where the code rests and try making a few changes to the code, play around with the GUI and get a feel of the sugar environment if you arent familiar before.
4. Know all about cordova - from in and out , visit the cordova repos : https://github.com/apache/cordova-lib, https://github.com/apache/cordova-cli, https://github.com/apache/cordova-plugman , https://github.com/apache/cordova-js and some pltforms repo too : https://github.com/apache/cordova-android, https://github.com/apache/cordova-ios etc. Read the docs : http://cordova.apache.org/docs/en/4.0.0/
5. Know about sugar -web architecture : http://developer.sugarlabs.org/web-architecture.md.html , https://github.com/sugarlabs/sugar-web , https://surajgillespie123.wordpress.com/
6. Carefully read through the last post of how the cordova plugins are made and make a demo plugin for sugar  - note - we want a working prototype of the demo for you to be eligible for the gsoc project - it can be a very simple prototype - just to judge whether you got the workflow or not - if you need help you can mail me.
7. Suggest a list of plugins you aim to code this summer along with the relevantworkflow as to how you think you'll approach each of them - Note : Its shouldn't be the one in air ! We want a concrete set of list which you think you would accomplish, a result of thorough visualization and observation of yourself of how much time you would take to complete each plugin and what all you can do, a complete list of plugins which you think are feasible and good for the sugar community - If you wish to discuss your ideas feel free to discuss them on mail - note : better the list and more feasible it looks on your profile - higher your chances of getting selected.
8.Lastly, keep a blog about your progress on these points, a record of all what you have done and whats remaining, a place where you jot down your daily progress on the above points and present to us in a systematic manner and dont forget - we are always there to help you when you need help - email at puneet.gkaur@gmail.com for help if needed.


All the best guys !!

by Puneet Kaur (noreply@blogger.com) at March 10, 2015 05:11 PM

February 26, 2015

OLPC fun in Bhagmalpur, India

Bossa Nova in Banaras

In my previous post, I had written about unencumbered codecs that ship on the OLPC XO, versus the popular demand for video in MP4 container (usually H.264 video). This post has a strange twist with another container: WebM.

WebM is a container put forth by Google. They also proceeded to embed the codec support within Chromium/Chrome. Firefox supports it natively as well. So, videos in WebM will play in Chromium/Chrome and Firefox without a plug-in.

When I travel, I download my favorite tunes from YouTube by using the “FlashGot” plugin. I prefer to download these in WebM (the irony!). Perhaps I am violating some “Terms of Service” somewhere, but that’s a rant for another day.

After my Bhagmalpur visit in Jan 2015, I headed back to Hyderabad. I took a train from Shahganj to Varanasi (aka Banaras) and then after a short stop, I was scheduled to take a flight out of the Varanasi airport in Babatpur (rural Banaras). As fate would have it, or rather as Indigo airlines would have it, their pilot wasn’t experienced enough to land the aircraft in the fog, and so, we had no return aircraft. I was stranded at Varanasi airport with no way to take another flight. Long story short, I ended up spending the night at the airport (usually a No No, but we had special permission!) along with two other travelers. They turned out to be visitors from Brazil and Italy. We had a great conversation that evening and the next day, hanging out at a small airport, eating stale cheese sandwiches. I got reminded of the Langoliers!

Waiting for the Langoliers at Varanasi airport!

Waiting for the Langoliers at Varanasi airport!

Towards the afternoon, I recalled that I had a copy of some “Bossa Nova” tunes downloaded in WebM format. What luck! Here were two people who spoke [Brazilian] Portuguese, stranded in the thick of rural India, and I had “Desafinado” and “Girl from Ipanema” on my laptop! We sat down and listened to a somewhat strange rendition of “Desafinado” by

1) Nova Music LA and

2)  an interesting version of Girl (actually Boy) from Ipanema by Dionne Warwick and Sacha Distel

(with appropriate apologies to Vinícius de Moraes, Antônio Carlos Jobim and João Gilberto).

Such great coincidence, or perhaps I’m just cool like that :-) Shortly after that, we thankfully got onto our respective flights and headed our different ways. After keeping in touch with my new friends, it turns out they are biodiversity researchers. I hope they’ll come visit us in California to see the Redwoods for themselves! I hope the Langoliers will enjoy the Bossa Nova when they get to the Varanasi airport ;-)

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="312" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FolEno814Gk?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" type="text/html" width="500"></iframe>

 

<iframe allowfullscreen="true" class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="312" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iRIxByKzIJE?version=3&amp;rel=1&amp;fs=1&amp;showsearch=0&amp;showinfo=1&amp;iv_load_policy=1&amp;wmode=transparent" type="text/html" width="500"></iframe>

 

Desafinado on the OLPC XO-4 in HTML5

Desafinado on the OLPC XO-4 playing natively on YouTube in HTML5


by sv3rma at February 26, 2015 02:39 AM

February 13, 2015

Walter Bender

Sugar Digest 2015-02-12

Sugar Digest

1. A few weeks ago there was a guest op-ed piece, “Can students have too much tech?”, in the NY Times arguing among other things that Internet access was undermining programs like One Laptop per Child. I found it surprising that Susan Pinker would cite One Laptop per Child as the principle example of the children using computers to chat and play games on the Internet (which she soundly criticized), since almost none of the children who received laptop computers through OLPC programs have ready access to the Internet (at school or at home).  The exception of course being Uruguay, where every child has both a laptop and Internet access. Indeed, as a 2010 survey showed, the children in Uruguay play games – they are children after all – but they also use email, search for information, chat (also known as reading and writing), make music, artwork, and videos, program, and, in general, use the computer as a tool for problem solving. Contrary to the assertion that the program is “drive-by” education, a continuing effort is put into teacher training, community support, and outreach.

That said, some people associated with OLPC —  including my former colleague Mr. Negroponte — are outspoken advocates for solutions that mitigate the need for teachers in elementary education. The X Prize for Education is designed around that approach and further requires that any proposed solutions be Android-tablet based. Not to say that it may be possible to engineer such a solution, to constrain the contest to an unproven pedagogical framework seems ill-advised. (Many tablet-based solutions have begun to distribute physical keyboards in acknowledgment that no one serious about writing or programming works exclusively with an on-screen keyboard. And while it is theoretically possible to exercise Software Freedoms on an Android tablet, in practice it is still well beyond most of us.) Meanwhile, here at Sugar Labs, we encourage open collaboration among students, teachers, and our community.

2. Martin Abente, our Sugar Release Manager, is pleased to announce the release of Sugar (sucrose) 0.104.0. This release includes new features and a multitude of bug fixes from Google Code-In and Summer of Code students, deployments and community members.

We are compiling detailed release notes at 0.104/Notes.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this release and special thanks to Martin for shepherding the process.

3. Sugar Labs is applying to Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2015. The application to Google has been submitted and we are in the process of building the associated wiki pages Summer_of_Code/2015. We often use GSoC as a way of exploring new ideas and future directions; for example, last summer we had projects on extending Turtle Blocks into three-dimensions and porting Sugar to Python 3, among others. This year we are going to take a more focused approach, concentrating on fleshing out and making more robust the Javascript support within Sugar. Sample projects will be added to the wiki over the next few days. We can always use more project ideas (please add them to the wiki) and more mentors (if you are interested, please contact me over the next few weeks).

In the community

4. Tony Anderson reports that he has finally has most of the Project Bernie website completed. This website shows what content is available on the School Server. (The School Server is a repository of content and services for Sugar deployments.) Tony reports that there are about 200 Sugar activities available to be installed from the school server; digital textbooks from Siyavula, and courses on Python, Web technology, and the Command Line Interpreter (Terminal activity).

Tech Talk

5. Peter Robinson, who has been coordinating the Sugar on a Stick releases (most recently for Fedora 21 [x86_64], [i686]) is looking for help coordinating testing and general community communications and facilitation. Peter is a great mentor, so it would be a nice opportunity for someone(s) to both contribute to the project and to learn more about packaging. Please contact Peter (pbrobinson AT gmail DOT com) if you are interested.

Sugar Labs

6. Please visit our planet.

by Walter Bender at February 13, 2015 03:09 PM

January 31, 2015

OLPC fun in Bhagmalpur, India

To Ogg or not to Ogg, that is the question

In this recent trip to Bhagmalpur, Anish Mangal and I discovered something interesting. We’ve strived hard to keep the content available through unencumbered formats such as Ogg Vorbis for audio and Ogg Theora for video. Unsurprisingly, the OLPC XO laptop supports these out of the box, but will not run MPEG 4 videos.

Some kids were upset. How would they watch Shah Rukh Khan on their XOs? These kids go to a repair shop nearby and get videos copied over to a USB stick for a small sum of money. However, the videos are in MP4, and they don’t play on the XO.

Yet, we found a Shah Rukh Khan song number on a XO. How did that happen? Did they install the MP4 codec on the laptop? Some conversations later, we found out. They first figured out that the TED videos that do play on the XO are in OGV format. Next, they asked the guy at the shop to convert the Shah Rukh Khan MP4 to OGV. That’s it. Simple as a samosa. Now Shah Rukh Khan lives in OGV! Richard M. Stallman and Shah Rukh Khan are happy together in some universe :-)

SRK in OGV

SRK in OGV


by sv3rma at January 31, 2015 04:49 AM

January 03, 2015

Sugar Labs Argentina

2014 at work

Time to do a balance, at least related to the work I did in the year.
As I found difficult remember all I did in the year, and we moved to GitHub,did a few scripts and used the statistics provided by the site.


First, a disclaimer. Measure work in commits as any other way of measure,have a very relative value. Different work have difficult than can't be compared. In my case, work in activities usually is much easier and fast than work in the toolkit or Sugar. At times reviews and testing the work of other takes a lot of time, and so. But these are the numbers I have, then, let's play with that.

This is a distribution of the commits in the different repositories I maintain:
 

Of course, many hackers contributed to these projects. From the logs I can find to: Aneesh Dogra, Cristian García,Daksh Shah,gauravp94, Goutam, Guillermo Trinidad,Ignacio Rodríguez, James Cameron, Martin Abente Lahaye, Sai Vineet, Sam Parkinson and Sebastian Silva. Paul Cotton provided improved designs for many activities.

My Open Source Report Card say I am one of the 8% most active Python users... I suppose that is pretty good, but more than nothing, could be because I have the fortune of do all my work in the open.

This year, I released a version of art4apps module, and new versions of Develop, Domino, Finance, FotoToon, Help, ImageViewer, Log, Maze, Memorize, Poll and Read. Many improvements in these activities were developed by students participating in Google Summer of Code and Google Code In contests.

I was lucky to of participate in the Young Hackers Summit in Montevideo, and travel to San Francisco to represent SugarLabs in the Google CodeIn Summit with the contest winners Ignacio Rodríguez and  Jorge Gomez.

Finally, I am happy to note we organized with the help of Manuel Quiñones and Martin Abente the first SugarLabs Backgrounds Contest and that backgrounds will be available in the next version of Sugar.

by Gonzalo Odiard (noreply@blogger.com) at January 03, 2015 06:52 AM

December 10, 2014

Fargo XO / Sugar Labs NDSU

The Troubling Optics Behind the President Learning to Code : Stager-to-Go

The Troubling Optics Behind the President Learning to Code : Stager-to-Go.

I was just telling a friend that I hate getting sucked in by Code.org and Code Hour and all the program or be programmed rhetoric.  Yet I keep getting sucked in.

After reading this, I will be stronger.


by kab13 at December 10, 2014 10:00 PM

October 03, 2014

Mel Chua

Unlock challenge: raise $1024 for The Ada Initiative, support women in open tech/culture, and unlock more open-licensed “programming learning styles” material!

Last year, I wrote a post asking people to donate to the Ada Initiative and support women in open technology and culture. I said:

We change the world with millions of tiny patches… our world of open technology and culture is built one patch, one line, one edit at a time — and that’s precisely why it’s powerful. It brings billions of tiny, ordinary moments together to transform the world. If we teach it for our code, we can preach it for our giving. If you’d buy me a drink, or treat an open source newcomer to dinner, send that $3-$20 to the Ada Initiative tonight. –August 30, 2013

Why do we need to do this? Well, being a woman in open technology and culture is like riding a bike on a street made for cars, where rain and dirt get kicked into your face, and you are constantly, painfully aware that if you have any sort of collision with a car… the car will win. Yes, this is happening in our world, to our friends and to our colleagues; it’s happened to me personally more times than I care to remember. The farther you are from the straight white male difficulty setting, the rougher the terrain becomes.

And quite honestly, we’re busy. I’m busy. You’re busy. This isn’t our job — we have so many other things to do. I mean, we’re all:

  • remixing music
  • playing with code
  • writing science fiction
  • co-authoring open content articles
  • redesigning user interfaces
  • <insert your favorite open technology and culture activity here>

And guess what? There are so many people who want to join us. So many people who want to help us do all this work, but don’t, because they know that work — the good work — is likely to come with a lot of really, really awful stuff, like this sampling of incidents since last year (trigger warning: EVERYTHING).

The less time women spend dealing with that stuff, the more time they have to help us with our work. And the more people will want to help us with our work. I mean, would you want to accept a job description that included the item “must put up with demeaning harassment and sexual jokes at any time, with no warning, up to 40+ hours per week”?

Making our world a good environment for all sorts of people is, in fact, our job — or at least part of it. The folks at the Ada Initiative have made supporting women in open tech/culture their entire job — supporting it, supporting people who support it, and basically being the equivalent of code maintainers… except instead of code, the patches they’re watching and pushing and nudging are about diversity, inclusion, hospitality, and just plain ol’ recognition of the dignity of human beings.

They want to support you. With better conference environments, training workshops and materials, and really awesome stickers, among many other things. (Did you know that the Ada Initiative was one of the first woman-focused tech organizations to actually say the word “feminism”?)

So please, donate and support them, so they can support you — and me, and all of us — in supporting women in open tech/culture.

Now, my own contribution is a bit… sparse, financially. I’m a grad student earning less than $800 a month, and I’m waiting for my paycheck to come in so I can contribute just a few dollars — but every little bit helps. And there’s another way I can help out: I can bribe you, dear readers, to donate.

Remember that “active vs reflective” learning styles post I wrote in August? Well, there are 3 more: sensing/intuitive, visual/verbal, and global/sequential. I’ve got them all transcribed here and ready to go. And if we reach $1024 in donations to the Ada Initiative under the Learning Styles campaign within the next week, I will release them under a creative-commons license.

What’s more: the first 3 people who donate $128 or more to this campaign and email me their receipt will get a free 1-hour Skype call with me to discuss their personal programming learning styles, and will be featured as case studies on one of those three posts (I’ll link to your website and everything).

Donate to the “learning styles” campaign for The Ada Initiative now!

by Mel at October 03, 2014 03:56 AM

September 22, 2014

Porting Sugar to Python3

GSoC 2014 - Porting to Python3 Round Up

Hello Everyone,

This is my round up post for my GSoC 2014 - Porting to Python3 Project.

I know I am almost a month late but it's better late than never i guess.
Just after the GSoC coding period was over my internet broke down and I was completely without internet for almost two weeks and just after that I got busy with my exams. My exams finished yesterday, so here I am today.

When I started the project I expected to complete it even before the deadline, but the more I got into it I realized how wrong I was. The actual changes I made were trivial Python3 syntax changes but finding where the problem was kind of difficult because of the subtle differences between Python2 and 3 due to which building the modules wouldn't completely stop but gave unexpected results. So most of my time this summer went into researching, debugging and handling multiple modules together.

So, in the beginning of the project i researched the changes that needed to be made from Python2 to Python3 then i started with porting sugar-build to Python3 which took quite some time because it was the first module. All the modules that I ported and the changes I made can be found in my previous posts.

I also researched the changes that needed to be made in telepathy-python which is now deprecated and not compatible with Python3.Basically , we would need to replace telepathy-python with gobject-introspection in sugar in order for everything to work correctly in Python3.
By the end I was able to port and build all the modules of sugar except sugar-datastore to Python3. Now all those modules are compatible with Python2 as well as Python3.

Although this is a big step in the right direction , it will still take along time to completely shift all the sugar modules to Python3.

In the end I just wanna thank the Sugarlabs for making me a part of their community and specially my mentors Walter Bender, Gonzalo Odiard and Sameer Verma for helping me with any problems that I faced.

Although I think that I could have learnt a lot more if I had a more personal and bonding interaction with any of my mentors but I still learnt a lot during this summer and I am grateful for that.
I'll also try to stay in touch with the happenings of Sugarlabs and try to contribute whenever possible.

I guess that's it for today , thanks for reading and goodbye!

by kunal arora (noreply@blogger.com) at September 22, 2014 03:13 PM

September 08, 2014

Sugar Labs Argentina

Cumbre Juvenil - Montevideo, Uruguay (September 20 a 23 de 2014)

Comparto invitación al evento

Queridos colegas,
ANEP (Administración Nacional de Educación Pública) y Sugar Labs se han propuesto organizar una Cumbre Mundial Juvenil de Programadores, un lugar de encuentro entre jóvenes de distintas partes del mundo que se encuentran trabajando en el desarrollo de software. Aprovechando este espacio de encuentro, queremos convocar a líderes de programas educativos interesados en el potencial que la tecnología tienen en el aprendizaje, y el promover participación auténtica de los estudiantes en este contexto.

Quiénes deben participar:
- Jóvenes de los diferentes programas educativos, que se hayan destacado por su interés en la programación y/o que hayan realizado contribuciones concretas al desarrollo del ambiente de aprendizaje Sugar.
- Líderes de los programas, interesados en participar en una serie de reuniones estratégicas para definir el futuro del ambiente de aprendizaje Sugar.

Por qué participar en este encuentro:
- Para trabajar y aprender con jóvenes desarrolladores de Python, reconocidos internacionalmente,
- Ayudar a definir el futuro del ambiente de aprendizaje Sugar y las futuras generaciones de software para aprendizaje,
- Para conectar con expertos, convencidos del potencial de la tecnología en el desarrollo y aprendizaje de los jóvenes,
- Para fortalecer la comunidad de usuarios del ambiente de aprendizaje Sugar alrededor del mundo.

Todos los interesados en participar en este importante encuentro deben ponerse en contacto con nosotros inmediatamente. ANEP ha ofrecido financiación de gastos locales para los jóvenes que participarán en este evento.
Cordialmente,

José Miguel Garcia
(ANEP)

Walter Bender
(Sugar Labs)

Para incribirse solo deben ingresar al siguiente formulario:

by Gonzalo Odiard (noreply@blogger.com) at September 08, 2014 05:10 PM